Seminarians for Life International

old-sfl-logoother-languagesSFLI’s newsletter seeks to serve as an instrument to provide seminarians and professors with examples of the pro-life pastoral work of priests and seminarians as well as insights concerning the extensive and growing Magisterium regarding life and family. Our hope for the newsletter is to foster interest in forming seminarians for life groups and help many to deepen their love and understanding of the rich teaching and pastoral practice contained within the Gospel of Life.

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Seminiarians for Life International Newsletter is available in the following languages:

English
Francais
Espanol
Italiano

The following are articles from hli.org relating to Seminarians for Life International:

Blessings Flow from the Camino for Seminarians for Life International

Summarizing a major life event – one involving virtually three weeks of walking over 500 kilometers on the Camino in Santiago de Compostela to the tomb of the Apostle James – is not easy. Words like achievement, intimacy with God, and physical suffering come to mind. With so many significant experiences, I have chosen a few that stood out. Once I . . . Read more

Storks’ Fertility Illuminates Irony of Camino’s Abandoned Villages

Following the ancient pilgrimage “Camino” to Santiago de Compostela, I was amazed at the number of storks, a traditional symbol of fertility. In fact, a common scene was storks nesting on the church towers in village after village. The flourishing storks contrast greatly with the evident decay — and sometimes total abandonment — of these human . . . Read more

Growing in Faith along the Camino

It seems self-evident that a pilgrimage is an act of faith and religious devotion. The Camino de Santiago de Compostela, in particular, is a punishing path that only a masochist – one who takes pleasure out of pain – would do for fun. Blisters, scrambling up and down goat paths and sloshing along in driving . . . Read more

Pro-Life Thoughts on the Camino

My primary purpose for walking the Camino de Santiago de Compostela was to perform a spiritual pilgrimage that has been undertaken since ancient times by countless Christians. Even with such intent, however, some of the decay of modern society is apparent. As I walked through the picturesque cities of Castilla & Leon in Northern Spain, . . . Read more