How Does Abortion Affect the United States?

Since the first states legalized the procedure in 1967, there have been over 60 million abortions performed in the United States.  Eighteen percent of our nation’s entire population has disappeared into the latter‑day extermination camps we know as abortion clinics. How has the loss of so much of our population affected the social and economic . . . Read more

Does Abortion Reduce Welfare Costs?

Supporters of abortion tend to lack foresight and and misunderstand human nature.  These defects inevitably lead to many cases of the “law of unintended consequences.” An example of this lack of foresight is the claim that, when the State pays for a poor woman’s abortion, it saves a lot of money by avoiding the costs . . . Read more

Storks’ Fertility Illuminates Irony of Camino’s Abandoned Villages

Following the ancient pilgrimage “Camino” to Santiago de Compostela, I was amazed at the number of storks, a traditional symbol of fertility. In fact, a common scene was storks nesting on the church towers in village after village. The flourishing storks contrast greatly with the evident decay — and sometimes total abandonment — of these human . . . Read more

The Economic Impact of Abortion

(Vatican Radio) — In his teaching on reaching out to the poor and the marginalized, Pope Francis has stressed that human dignity must not be sacrificed for profits. But some advocates of population control argue that abortion benefits the economy and the common good. At a conference in Rome on Thursday, Joseph Meaney, the Director . . . Read more

A Paradigm Shift in International Development

People are not the problem. Someone from the international aid and development industry has some explaining to do. In an analysis of financial data from the decade ending in 2010, The Economist lists the world’s most populous nation, and six African nations whose total fertility rate is among the highest in the world, as being among the ten . . . Read more

Does Welfare Reduce Abortion?

1. The connection between welfare and illegitimacy is well-established: Social scientists have long documented that when women are paid to have children out of wedlock, they are more likely to do so. For example, James Q. Wilson wrote in the Fall 2005 In Character, “A third reason for single-parent families is that, at least in this country, welfare payments have enabled poor . . . Read more

Learning from the Panic Over Population Growth

The contrast is striking. On one side, we have those telling us that there are too many people in the world, and that for the sake of “women’s health” and “sustainability,” abortion and contraception must be basic rights—perhaps even an obligation for some—if we are to achieve sustainability in this world. On the other side . . . Read more

Singapore: Slowing Population Growth May Hurt a Great City

By almost any measure, Singapore is an impressive city. Actually, it is a city-state, and it is consistently rated as the most law-abiding nation in the world. Singapore has one of the best health care systems, resulting in the lowest infant mortality rate and longest life expectancy in the world. Illegal drug use and violence . . . Read more